FIRST EDITION OF DSSFFF

Is there any better plan than a Fashion Film Festival for this May bank holiday? NO. And it’s even more wonderful if this festival happens in San Sebastian, one of the most beautiful cities in Spain. On 2-3 of May you will be able to watch, inbetween all the wonderful local dishes, a great selection of fashion films in the Principal Theatre and attend an exhibition based on our beloved director’s work in Noventa Grados shop, as well as workshops and more activities. And, of course, there will be a great closing party at the new club DabaDaba. Here you are the perfect plan; if you already got something scheduled, just cancel it. The first edition of the Donostia/San Sebastian Fashion Film Festival will be the bomb, just saying.

Crystal Rococo by Amber Cowan

We have never been really fans of minimalism or realism, you should know already. For this reason, this artist living in Philadelphia has hit right in the centre of our hearts. Her talent is constantly overflowing, like her sculptures, so full of complements. In reality, if you watch them closely, you can see dolphins and cherubims (er, sorry for the rhyme). In order to create her works of art, she visits street markets, looking for crystal pieces dating between 1940 and 1980. She overheats them and sculpts them again, getting the leafy results you can see here. The shapes of her sculptures are like evil figures that could only exist in the deepest oceans, but with a graceful pink colour to them, so they can be disguised as something perfectly innocent. They look alive, with spooky features and traces of moisture shining on their surface. Too many people together. These are Rococo collages from good old times, for the centre of crystal tables in the US.

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SASHA FAVOROV

This Ukrainian that calls himself photographer and retoucher is neat, smooth and ironic. He plays with light, texture and objects’ colour range, getting a new interpretation out of them. All very cool, very profound and already too repeated. The thing is that Favorov achieves all this even working with the most common objects around; he can turn a razor into an item we really really need to have. This is called “having the gift of aesthetics”. Inanimate objects that mix with animated objects creating a postcard that is too close to the dreamworld, feature that is, in fact, the strongest side of Favorov’s work. This hypnotic effect he delivers is not easy to get to; we like Sasha Favorov.

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Harry Griffin’s golden years

Getting old, that nightmare human beings have tried to escape from, deceive or postpone with miracle treatments, artichoke based diets or other stupid remedies. Let’s not be fooled, even if we get sentimental with The Golden Girls or Betty White, we don’t want to see ourselves with fake teeth, smelling like Weetabix, suffering from urine loss and with peanuts for benefits. Trying to look at the bright side of the scary scenery that’s coming towards us, I bring you the work of Harry Griffin and his portraits of the elderly. The pensioner life in South Florida, old people in sunbeds, daikiris and prosthesis; that’s the retirement I want, surrounded by luxury and suncream. The photographer not only focused on the bizarre world of getting old. Have a look at the rest of his work: in the Convention series he portraits how kitsch and perturbing the convention and trade fair world can be. While you’re looking through his website I’m going to work on my pension plan. See ya in a 2067 sunbed!

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Aron Filkey and his Artesign

This hungarian Graphic Designer that works on Art Direction, Advertising, Editorial Design and Space Design it’s the perfect example of how to deal with a commissioned job without losing your own personal style. Aron Filkey is interested in exploring and trying new things that will provide its work with an artistic profile, an identity mark that makes him different from the other jillion Graphic Designers that walk this Earth. Thanks to his good aesthetic perception, he creates nearly absurd yet very attractive compositions and he had collaborated with projects such as Typography Issue of the Computer Arts Magazine, WAD Magazine or The Room Magazine. He collaborates with the amazing photographer Mate Moro. ¡Behold, they’re gonna be a big thing!

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Pretty, cheap! by Quentin Shih

Chinese shops are like Ali Baba’s magical cave, and not because they are dark and gloomy, but because they contain lots of marvellous things. Photograph Quentin Shih knows it and started buying their trivial objects to later take photos of them. In this series, called 99 cents, the essential elements are pastel colours, a foggy aura, but most of all plastic, plastic and more plastic. Quentin doesn’t hide the fact these objects come from the shop at the corner of the street; on the contrary, he shows it on purpose, with the original price tags, where you can see the real price, 99 cents. Pretty and cheap.

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VOTE FOR NIXON! MATT HENRY

If you were born again and you could choose a different era, which one would it be?”. That tedious question that people with no social skills constantly use, anxiously waiting for an answer to analise to get hold of the conversation. I’ve always affirmed that my true place in History was being a Middle Ages Lord and take advantage of the marvellous (and unfortunately extinct) droit de seigneur. Nevertheless, my answer has changed since I came across Matt Henry’s work and his Nixon time deep USA sceneries. No doubt now, I should’ve been born in a little town in Iowa, attended country social meetings, taken part in some sort of Friends of the Rifle club, have a nice taxidermy display in my living room and defended Richard Nixon and his most blatant liberalism with my life. Live the life Matt Henry presents us in his pictures, recreating the 60s USA in sets and fake sceneries, with Elvis singing everywhere, watching university hippies demonstrate in the streets while I polish my boots and chew tobacco, rifle on my hand… That’s the life I should’ve lived, the republican American Dream and not the Spanish building crisis… Anyway, we will always have Henry’s work, Elvis’ discography and a Bourbon bottle to remember that era we never lived in.

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STONE, PAPER, CACTUS. ECAL.

Another edition of the Salone Internazionale del Mobile has happened in the city of the most fabulous cotoletta (you gotta taste that, really) of the world, Milan. In those 6 days, the whole town becomes a massive showcase for those product designers in love with cardboard, wood, marble, plastic and approximately a thousand materials more. But let’s separate the grain from the chaff. In the Brera district, inside the Fuorisalone, we were able to see the Lusanne ECAL University of Arts and Design incredibly young students’ proposal; based on the premises of being interactive, there was multicolour marble, movement detecting mirrors, objects defying gravity, even real movement sensitive cacti! Again, another edition of the Salone Internazionale del Mobile where youngsters have more to say than big brands. We need more new faces and less revival classics!”

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Office selfies: Isabelle Wenzel

Yeah, we know what selfies are and we hate to mention them to start with this post (even using them on the title). A selfie, what was before know as a self-portrait, that ended up like a Facebook duckface pic or a Vang Gogh painting, a whatever to yourself. We’re kind of very tired of that “selfie” word, we get the shakes if we hear it. Unless it’s 3a.m. and we’re in the friendship exaltation stage, we heard the selfie call to arms and we build a little but fast pile full of glamour. We’re now in the studio though and our lovely followers must already know by heart what’s on the shelves behind us. Thanks to heaven, here’s Isabelle Wenzel to set a new trend; colour stockings, a cup of tea or a vase, one fine booty and… voilà!

Isabelle is just fantastic. This German photographer’s work is based on studying the human body. Nearly impossible positions that make bodies look like sculptures. Colourful photos full of tension. Will the cup fall? Who knows. Just imagine the moment; click on the button and start running to the spot, get the booty out position, put the cup on and… ¡done! Now imagine the process is repeated till the picture looks perfect. Pure genius, that’s what Isabelle Wenzel is.

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Barbie & Bob Mackie (Not Ken)

Aaaaalright, I must admit I was a Barbie kid. And I don’t mean I wore girly bobby socks while riding my horse (horse whose hair would be much shinier than mine) on the Country Riding Club. What I meant is that I had the priviledge to own a big collection of Barbie dolls. As their dressed didn’t look fabulous enough, I used to cut my homemade ones (call me old, but we didn’t have Zara Kids back then) to create their new wardrobe. I remember cutting them from behind, thinking that my mum would never find the massive hole if it was in the back (silly me). I used to spend hours cutting and watching how my Barbie would turn into a Cher style diva. And now, silly me (again), I find out that I could’ve made a life out of that like Bob Mackie does. I find it difficult to believe that there’s someone whose job is dressing Cher (as plastic filled as a Barbie) and whose hobby is dressing Barbies as if they were Cher. Don’t you think is amazing or is it me being loopy for my childhood memories? (Thanks Bob for unleashing my nostalgic side).

Judge yourselves, we’re sure Mackie’s work would provoke little heart attacks in you!

(P.S: My Barbies we’re nothing compared to Bob’s incredible creations. Mine looked more like Frankenstein’s gypsy cousins).

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