FAT & FURIOUS BURGER, VOL. II

We’re very happy to announce that, finally, Spring is here. You didn’t know, did you? What we’re not so happy about are the 800+ diets that come up to our brains; from the artichoke diet to the melon one through the more “let’s get physical” ones. They all just sound daunting. We begin to sweat and just by thinking about them we got a headache. But, boys and girls, once again, La Monda is here to solve the problems; stop worrying and enter this wonderful website, buy all the prints, dress your rooms-corridors-living rooms-bathrooms in them and bite your nails while you imagine yourself munching on one of those huge greasy burgers by Fat & Furious Burger. Trust us, this diet will allow you to wear trikinis for Sónar.

fat and furious burguer photography colour still life lamondamagazine

fat and furious burguer photography colour still life lamondamagazine

fat and furious burguer photography colour still life lamondamagazine

fat and furious burguer photography colour still life lamondamagazine

fat and furious burguer photography colour still life lamondamagazine

fat and furious burguer photography colour still life lamondamagazine

PIP&POP: Sweetened smack

I remember myself when I was a kid; glued to the TV screen like a raver hugging a baffle, drooling and with my eyeballs out of their place. I remember how I would expose myself to a constant advertising bombarding, being overwhelmed by Nintendos, Micho Machines, dogs that would poop and dolls that would cry so loud that would turn my heartbeat into “rat heart” level rhythm. The ones I remember the most are those “My Little Pony” and “Care Bear” ads, so full of cute cheesy images, happy tunes and fluor colours that, just after watching them, they made you feel as if you had eaten 2kg of sugar. Just remembering them makes me want to bite a lemon.

That candyfloss taste comes back to life when watching Tanya Schultz’s work, who, under the name of Pip&Pop creates installations using glitter, plastic flowers, sugar or sweets. No one can stay the same after such a smack of aggressive cheesiness.

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

JOE JOHNSON: Velvet and bling

Arcades and casinos have always been a cult space to artists linked to everything kitsch and rampant consume politics. Las Vegas is the new Mecca to those followers of bad taste and gold finish; highlights, neon lights, vending machines, carpet, plastic flowers and other decorative elements that would burn any AD subscriber’s eyes are the ingredientes that fill the work of these artists.

Desolating sceneries as the ones of Joe Johnson and his photography; abandoned spaces that smell of naphthalene and show the decadence that 70s interior design drowned into. Artificial deep America environment, from TV sets and arcades to churches lead by preachers with teeth whitening treatments. Disturbing architecture in front of this American photographer’s lense whose portfolio highlights the absence of characters, letting the place get al the spotlight. Furniture and interiorism that present an alternative to what Ikea says; we say yes to carpet, mirrors and sparkling curtains in all public buildings. Let’s break some ground and bring kitsch back!

JOE JOHNSON photography lamondamagazine

JOE JOHNSON photography lamondamagazine JOE JOHNSON photography lamondamagazine JOE JOHNSON photography lamondamagazine JOE JOHNSON photography lamondamagazine JOE JOHNSON photography lamondamagazine JOE JOHNSON photography lamondamagazine

JAMES OSTRER: SUPER SWEET PARTY

We all thought it was pretty normal and natural back in the time, but, to be honest, the nearly-rave-looking excess in which, birthday party after birthday party we’d go into by singing happy birthday to seven candles on a cake and we’d end up covered in peanut butter, cheetos dust, mud and “edible” colourful sprinkle had nothing to lose against those crazy parties of the NY subculture in the 80s.

We are quite sure that something happened in James Ostrer’s brain in one of those parties. It just has to be that; otherwise, there’s no way of explaining the culinary-portray wonders this British artist creates. Using his friends (we assume they’re friends, ’cause I can’t image what kind of stranger would like to have to wash his hair 5 times to get rid off the smell of whipped cream) that might as well be drugged in phormol, Ostrer criticises the excessive dependency our nowadays society has for sugar with a shocking and attractive aesthetic. Happy… birthday?

james ostrer photo masks lamondamagazine

james ostrer photo masks lamondamagazine

james ostrer photo masks lamondamagazine

james ostrer photo masks lamondamagazine

james ostrer photo masks lamondamagazine

MESS AGE: CASE IN POINT

Is there any better way of beginning a post than using a word game? Yeah, lots. But, in the age of message t-shirts, mugs, bags, badges and what not, a good copy sells more than Britney on a rough day with paparazzi.

MESS AGE know about this; with mottos like “#selfie”, “I am always right” or “look at me”, their cases have become what every iPhone 6 user would like to have. Another twist to the “an image is worth 1000 words” theory. Death to selfies, hail to #selfie.

LOBULO AND HIS HOLY PATIENCE

Besides the fact that we love his artistic name, Lobulo is one of those examples of the savoir-faire, of good taste and patience, features all creative soul needs to face every day of the year (Chinese year too) with a positive outlook and rainbow eyes. He knows how to use his hands, he chooses materials carefully and finishes his work with great detail… and the result of this is names like Google, Coca-Cola, Converse or New Era in his client list. All real, all physical, all in volume; Lobulo has magic in his hands.

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lobulo paper design graphic product lamondamagazine

A TASTE OF SÓNAR: FELIX FAIRE

Have you ever shared some time with someone that plays any sort of percussion? No matter if they come from the London Philharmonic Orchestra, the side band for Cliff Richards or some grindcore metal group, they will all have something in common: that constant “playing” everything around, the the need to rhythmically tap the table or a leg.

Felix Faire has taken playing the environment to a whole new level. This British musician, architect and coder has created “Contact: Augmented Acoustics”, a technology project that turns any tactile surface in a music instrument. Faire is young (1991), but using microphones and knock recognition wave analysis he’s already been proclaimed one of the 7 designers of the future by Design Week. A crazy mix between Minority Report, giant piano rugs and an intergalactic musical, Augmented Acoustics looks like a key part of the future.

Felis Faire will be talking and playing his show on Thursday, 5th of March, at the Mazda Space Barcelona invited by Sónar+D by Mazda Rebels.

DOLLARSTORE: LOVING NUCLEAR HOLOCAUST

They say that if there was a nuclear disaster to happen only cockroaches, probably jellyfish (that thing has been floating in the sea for ages doing NOTHING), Hugh Hefner and Robert Smith would survive, all dancing happily in front of the destruction of the Earth. Or maybe not, but in an apocalyptic scenery, I’d rather see some absurd.

Absurdity is the pillar in which Benoit Paille and Daniel Delisle have seated for their “DollarStore” session. As Paille explains, the background of this amazing dollar store stuff still life series is highlighting its nonsense existence, creating a discussion on the consume society and the human exploitation cost in China that these objects have. Impeccable aesthetics, well mixed colours and melted little animal figures that wouldn’t cost more than 1$ and seem to shake of fantasy toxic waste. Paille and Delisle have nailed it.

Benoit Paille Daniel Delisle dollarstore photography lamondamagazine

Benoit Paille Daniel Delisle dollarstore photography lamondamagazine

Benoit Paille Daniel Delisle dollarstore photography lamondamagazine

Benoit Paille Daniel Delisle dollarstore photography lamondamagazine

Benoit Paille Daniel Delisle dollarstore photography lamondamagazine

Benoit Paille Daniel Delisle dollarstore photography lamondamagazine

Benoit Paille Daniel Delisle dollarstore photography lamondamagazine

LADY BEARD: SING, DANCE, DESTROY

If we look up “polymathy” or “Renaissance Man” in Wikipedia, we check that it’s a concept used to name individuals that succeed in various knowledge areas, people that are ace at many things, from aeronautical engineering to glazed ceramic or advanced level sudoku. Said definition is completed by a long list of men considered to be polymaths; Aristotle, Goethe, Descartes and many others. It’s surprising not only the absolute absence of female names in the scholars list, but also how outdated it is, taking into account that the youngest of them died more than 60 years ago.

This humble writer would like to update the “Renaissance Man” list introducing LadyBeard. Yes, beloved friends, even though he’s a total stranger to us, in the Empire of the Rising Sun, Lady Beard is considered a huge eclectic artist. A good looking Australian giant that, after making it big in Taiwan and Hong Kong, he’s determined to take over Japan. Under his “Sing, Dance, Destroy” motto, this ginger hunk enters wrestling rings dressed up as a saucy Japanese schoolgirl while singing typical Cantonese songs in heavy metal style, posing for fashion editorials and starring his own TV show. All very standard. A Godzilla with braids and mascara that conquers all; LadyBeard is, without the shadow of a doubt, the perfect contemporary polymath.