RIIKKA HYVÖNEN: POLYCHROME BUTTS

One more year, we’ve overcome Xmas time and the cycle of family meetings, Xmas carols, over-sugared kids and corny TV shows with it. We proudly say goodbye to all those elements that diabolically represent this festivity, but we can’t say cheerio to the lamb, pork, booze, pies, yorkshire puddings and cocktails that are hanging to our abdominal area like a chav to a Primark top. “It’s normal, it’s January” is the weak excuse that we all use whilst trying to believe that February will be a magical corset that will leave you with a lovely post-war body; let’s face it, you’ll have to sweat it all. Your new friends the love handles will only leave facing our demons at the gym.

There’s tonnes of ways to do it and all of them are horrible; beginning with zumba with a bag full of bricks to sauna yoga with steam, pain and zero dignity. Riikka Hyvönen shows us on her painting the suffering of different butts when, wearing roller skates, have kissed the ground. Polychrome butts that clearly reflect the martyrdom against Xmas excesses.

50-shades-of-purple-small-kopio
 —
omg-uk-made-in-uk1
 —
good-god-to-the-bruise-and-the-booty-way-to-go-out-with-a-bang
 —
violet-youre-turning-violet-violet-kopio
 —
i-got-a-really-beautiful-bruise-kopio
 —
oh-lord-bigger-kopio
 —
little-scratch-kopio

PIP&POP: Sweetened smack

I remember myself when I was a kid; glued to the TV screen like a raver hugging a baffle, drooling and with my eyeballs out of their place. I remember how I would expose myself to a constant advertising bombarding, being overwhelmed by Nintendos, Micho Machines, dogs that would poop and dolls that would cry so loud that would turn my heartbeat into “rat heart” level rhythm. The ones I remember the most are those “My Little Pony” and “Care Bear” ads, so full of cute cheesy images, happy tunes and fluor colours that, just after watching them, they made you feel as if you had eaten 2kg of sugar. Just remembering them makes me want to bite a lemon.

That candyfloss taste comes back to life when watching Tanya Schultz’s work, who, under the name of Pip&Pop creates installations using glitter, plastic flowers, sugar or sweets. No one can stay the same after such a smack of aggressive cheesiness.

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

LOBULO AND HIS HOLY PATIENCE

Besides the fact that we love his artistic name, Lobulo is one of those examples of the savoir-faire, of good taste and patience, features all creative soul needs to face every day of the year (Chinese year too) with a positive outlook and rainbow eyes. He knows how to use his hands, he chooses materials carefully and finishes his work with great detail… and the result of this is names like Google, Coca-Cola, Converse or New Era in his client list. All real, all physical, all in volume; Lobulo has magic in his hands.

lobulo_paper_design_graphic_product_lamondamagazine_7

lobulo_paper_design_graphic_product_lamondamagazine_6

lobulo_paper_design_graphic_product_lamondamagazine_5

lobulo_paper_design_graphic_product_lamondamagazine_3

lobulo_paper_design_graphic_product_lamondamagazine_2

lobulo paper design graphic product lamondamagazine

SAMUEL HENNE: ART ATTACKEN

Germany, that great country of sausages, controversial History, Berghain, real castles and rough language. Where people are doing well but don’t celebrate it; where being superior not only to other beings, but to entire countries, is a custom. Where surnames such as Düsediekerbäumer actually exist. The country of effectiveness. What would become of Europe without Germany.

Germany is also the country master of efficiency; have a look at photographer Samuel Henne‘s work. Using individual objects, this German creates with them a new thing and achieve what sounds rather difficult; functionality on an image. Utility, even. Something that emanates more of a purpose than you on a Sunday. Henne doesn’t seem to find beauty merely in the aesthetic, but he seems to pursue justification, probably due to his long genetic inheritance. Simply Wünderbar.

samuel henne photography artist sculpture still life lamondamagazine

samuel henne photography artist sculpture still life lamondamagazine

samuel henne photography artist sculpture still life lamondamagazine

samuel henne photography artist sculpture still life lamondamagazine

samuel henne photography artist sculpture still life lamondamagazine

samuel henne photography artist sculpture still life lamondamagazine

More quirky stools

Because something so simple and basic can give incredible results, we place our bets on it. Here are the latest chairs and stools of Dutch artist Stan Klamer; with mere ribbons and cords he succeeds in reinventing the old-fashioned furniture of our living rooms and transforming it into avant-garde furniture. As almost always, we encourage you from here to follow the evolution of this designer/artist. At the same time we also want to suggest new usages for your dirty old trainers’ shoelaces.

LI HONGBO GOES CRAFTY

It’s unbelievable what young Chinese artist Li Hongbo has managed to create out of something as simple as paper. Joining loads of layers (thousands maybe) in a block, Li achieves a solid structure where he can sculpt any kind of form, usually human bodies or skeletons. At first they look like plaster or marble sculptures, but they are actually sheets glued together following a beehive design. When stretched, all the sheets move in a indisputable precision; thus he creates a flexible sculpture that evolves into a scary or morbid piece, a toy for those fetishists that have, at some point desired, to deform someones face with kung-fu movements. As few will be so lucky to deform Li’s work (he’s now exhibiting on the Biennal of Sydney), we recommend you to use that post-it sticker notes that sit on your desk. The useless and out of date encyclopedia collection that takes too much space at home also works.