MICHAEL KORS: CATWALK ON YOUR SOFA

Michael Kors brings us the chance to enjoy his new collection without moving from our own sofas again and this is already the seventh time live from New York to Spain and the whole world. We’ll be here broadcasting on real time on our social media, fancy and keen, to make this Wednesday afternoon (4pm in Spain, 10am in NYC) a bit less dull and more inspiring. Moreover, you’ll be able to witness all the outfits of the celebrities that will attend the show minutes before the catwalk (don’t forget the #AllAccessKors and #MichaelKors hashtags!). La Monda feat. Michael Kors, famous on the whole wide world.

Paris Fashion Week, SS2014

The Paris Fashion Week is over, and now we can take a look back at what went on. It was one of the most hectic Fashion Weeks of the last seasons, and if you don’t believe so, check out American designer Rick Owens’ models: stomp dancing dancers (if you still don’t know what stomp dancing is, google is there to help you) who had to learn a 12 minutes long “choreography”. Real size models screaming and moving like real Amazons, most of them Afro-Americans, right when controversy about the lack of black models on the catwalks is at its highest moment. An innovative way to present clothing, which, aside from letting the design part stand out, caused more than some assistant to break into tears.

But these models weren’t the only ones to bring dance onto the catwalk. Gaultier recreated a dancing contest where the models were dancing to the beats of the 80’s, represented not only by music, but also in style, because the leather, the fringes and the tulle were the protagonists of the parade. We also mustn’t forget the presence, on magnificent jackets and bags, of his mythical stripes. A delight for the people attending the event.

Music was also protagonist during the show of the duo Viktor & Rolf, where models walked on the notes of a Pink Floyd remix, the perfect soundtrack for a sober collection of high school teens, wrapped up in black, white and blue blazers and gowns.

Even though some of the major brand’s stagings – like Givenchy’s car crash in the middle of the street, Chanel’s art gallery or Moncler’s skating gorilla – really impressed us, the biggest news this week was Marc Jacobs’ farewell to Vuitton. And of course, his goodbye couldn’t be more elegant, with a small retrospective dedicated to his trajectory for the French brand, as a whole rather gloomy and eccentric, vaguely resembling a burial (well, we wouldn’t really mind it was our own, with all those feathers, glitters, eroticism and exhibitionism that we love so much). An adieu that closes an era, a season in which the great brands placed their bets on designers who would later renew the world of fashion industry.

Such a triumphal farewell can only serve as a welcome for a new generation of designers: curious about the first signing? Well, it was JW Anderson for Loewe.
So we can already assure you: if this Fashion Week was somehow frantic, have your seat belt fastened for next year, because there are some turbulences coming.

BETSEY JOHNSON ROCKS

This week Betsey Johnson has presented her last collection in the city that never sleeps (a.k.a New York). This woman really knows about how to have fun. Those models that must be tired of the catwalks had the chance of laughing, pulling faces and have fun, speak on the phone or drink in the streets on New York style (having champagne, not Stella beer or cheap wine). The best bit is the ending; all the models, including Betsey Johnson, lay down and start performing their best aerobics moves. From La Monda we can only say: BRAVO.

DIRK BIKKEMBERGS

Belgian designer Dirk Bikkembergs’ last collection can make you feel anything but cold. Featured in the last Milan Fashion Week, he suggests to fight the most freezing days of the year with blankets tied around the neck or with the most 80s sky pants the next winter.
If none of this two new project is your cup of tea, you can always choose tight leggins or knit pants matched with sheer silk shirts; a bit ironic to face cold, don’t you think?