RIIKKA HYVÖNEN: POLYCHROME BUTTS

One more year, we’ve overcome Xmas time and the cycle of family meetings, Xmas carols, over-sugared kids and corny TV shows with it. We proudly say goodbye to all those elements that diabolically represent this festivity, but we can’t say cheerio to the lamb, pork, booze, pies, yorkshire puddings and cocktails that are hanging to our abdominal area like a chav to a Primark top. “It’s normal, it’s January” is the weak excuse that we all use whilst trying to believe that February will be a magical corset that will leave you with a lovely post-war body; let’s face it, you’ll have to sweat it all. Your new friends the love handles will only leave facing our demons at the gym.

There’s tonnes of ways to do it and all of them are horrible; beginning with zumba with a bag full of bricks to sauna yoga with steam, pain and zero dignity. Riikka Hyvönen shows us on her painting the suffering of different butts when, wearing roller skates, have kissed the ground. Polychrome butts that clearly reflect the martyrdom against Xmas excesses.

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good-god-to-the-bruise-and-the-booty-way-to-go-out-with-a-bang
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violet-youre-turning-violet-violet-kopio
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i-got-a-really-beautiful-bruise-kopio
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oh-lord-bigger-kopio
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little-scratch-kopio

TRACEY EMIN: PEOPLE LIKE YOU NEED TO FUCK PEOPLE LIKE ME

In La Monda Magazine we get hypnotized by slot machines, peepshow bars and fair rides; doctors have already said that if we follow on this path we’d end up in a seizure, but we don’t care.

Taking into account this attraction to all flashy, how could we not take a moment at Tracey Emin‘s work? Firework artist of all, the enfant terrible of contemporary Art has make it possible, along with Dan Flavin and Bruce Naumann, for neon lights to be found inside the pure and boring museum architecture. Her series of intimate and cheesy neon sentences drew our attention towards this artist that nearly won the Turner Price with her piece “The Bed”, in which she would show her own unmade bed surrounded by condoms, used towels and all sorts of rubbish. Emin got to the spotlight in a BBC interview, where she appeared high on Diazepam and in a “I don’t want to go back home to my mum’s” loop. That’s making a statement, and the rest is just nonsense. Tracey, girl, you rock!

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Tracey Emin's Bed Tate Modern FOR USE WITH REVIEW ONLY

Tracey Emin’s Bed
Tate Modern
FOR USE WITH REVIEW ONLY

PIP&POP: Sweetened smack

I remember myself when I was a kid; glued to the TV screen like a raver hugging a baffle, drooling and with my eyeballs out of their place. I remember how I would expose myself to a constant advertising bombarding, being overwhelmed by Nintendos, Micho Machines, dogs that would poop and dolls that would cry so loud that would turn my heartbeat into “rat heart” level rhythm. The ones I remember the most are those “My Little Pony” and “Care Bear” ads, so full of cute cheesy images, happy tunes and fluor colours that, just after watching them, they made you feel as if you had eaten 2kg of sugar. Just remembering them makes me want to bite a lemon.

That candyfloss taste comes back to life when watching Tanya Schultz’s work, who, under the name of Pip&Pop creates installations using glitter, plastic flowers, sugar or sweets. No one can stay the same after such a smack of aggressive cheesiness.

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

pip&pop art lamondamagazine

DAVID ALTMEJD: FLUX FLOWS

Flux. If you also had to look up what that means, you probably went to Wikipedia and found ten different meanings for the word in Science, Technology, Medicine and Arts. It’s time for a wake- up call for the Wikipedians though, because Flux is also the name David Altmejd gave to one of his works; “The Flux and the Puddle”, 2014. And, moreover, the name given to Altmejd’s retrospective in the Musée d’Arts Moderne in Paris.

We can only describe what Flux looks like;a mix of shapes and organs in gestation and crystals in formation, a universe of mixed dreams and nightmares. It’s plexiglas, quartz, polystyrene, expandable foam, epoxy clay, epoxy gel, resin, synthetic hair, clothing, leather shoes, thread, mirror, plaster, acrylic paint, latex paint, metal wire, glass eyes, sequin, ceramic, synthetic flowers, synthetic branches, glue, gold, feathers, steel, coconuts, aqua resin, burlap, lighting system including fluorescent lights, Sharpie ink, wood, coffee grounds, polyurethane foam. It’s another form of beauty.

david altmejd art exhibition paris

david altmejd art exhibition paris

david altmejd art exhibition paris

david altmejd art exhibition paris

david altmejd art exhibition paris